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PROJECTS

Heart to Heart Conversations: Perspectives on CMD Risk

This study explores the experiences of individuals with SCI, MS, CP, and SB, and their healthcare providers, to identify care gaps and opportunities for improving cardiometabolic disease (CMD) identification, treatment, and management.

MyBrainPacer

The Parkwood Planning & Pacing Points App is an interactive electronic version of the planning and pacing points system currently being implemented in the ABI Outpatient program at Parkwood Institute.

PRIME

Parkwood’s Program for Rehabilitation Innovations in Movement Enhancement

SCI IEQCC

Spinal Cord Injury: Implementation and Evaluation Quality Care Consortium

Sexual Health

Addressing gaps in sexual health post spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke, or acquired brain injury, our team at Parkwood Institute, comprised of clinicians, researchers, and individuals with lived experience, introduced a novel sexual health practice in 2017-2018 to enhance rehabilitation.

VIP4SCI

VIP4SCI is an e-health solution within an integrated model of care to improve the coordination of care across rehabilitation patients and community services with consistent and intentional self-management programming.

Modules to Enhance Care (MECs)

MECs are a set of grassroots programs, initiated by frontline clinicians and patients on the Regional Rehabilitation program at Parkwood Institute.

PPPlus

The Possibilities Project Plus (PP+) is an online platform that seeks to facilitate the exchange of assistive technologies. By creating a “swapshop,” the PP+ works to connect persons in need of essential medical equipment, to individuals looking to donate.

PRIME-UL

PRIME-UL is a spin off of PRIME and was born from the idea that "although walking is important, people have arms too!"

SENSORS

SENSORS project looks to see how wearable activity trackers can be monitor a patient’s activity level outside of therapy sessions and overall function at discharge.

Using Lumbosacral TENS to Reduce Spasticity & Enhance Mobility

This study investigates the potential of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in persons with spinal cord injuries.

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